Monday, June 19, 2006

Clones

I've had my fill of clones lately. Not only did we have Attack of the Clones a few years ago, but I just finished reading SL Viehl's Stardoc - where the main character, Cherijo, is a clone - and I watched The Island on DVD on Saturday night.

Warning: Movie spoiler!

The Island is the story of clones hidden away from society who think they're winning a lottery to leave their underground complex for 'The Island' - the last uncontaminated place on earth - when in reality they're being harvested for their organs. The storyline was predictable in many places, but kudos for the really outstanding action sequences. They could have fed a small country on the cost of the cars they destroyed in the making of the film. For me it's always a mixture of "Wow! look at that!" and "Geez, what a waste!" whenever I see Hollywood blockbusting stunts.

The problem with a clone films/books is that the whole plot seems to lie in the discovery that they're actually a clone, and then meeting their real maker - who usually turns out to be a nasty piece of work. Check on all counts for The Island. And StarDoc. But where else can a clone story take us? I'm not sure that there's much drama in clone stories except for this. Let me know if I'm wrong.

BTW, didn't the ending seem remarkably like Logan's Run? Actually, a lot of plot elements in The Island reminded me of Logan's Run. Mmmm.

5 comments:

MK Mancos/Kathleen Scott said...

The real problem with Attack of the Clones was the misnomer of a name. That particular espisode should have been...attack of the robots, since the clones were on the side of the good at that point. It wasn't until they were activated in espisode 3 they actually attacked.

I think there can be new ideas for clones that don't include the big reveal where the clone discovers that's what they are...I seem to think I either read or watched something where the clone knew they were a clone all the way through so the big reveal was actually about the other character. I don't remember the name now. I'll have to think on it.

Lynda K. Scott said...

Yeah, that plot does seem fairly standard, ie cliche. Didn't Bladerunner have clones (replicants) who knew what they were and knew they were gonna die on a certain day/time? I remember Rutger Hauer's character Roy Batty(?)was a pyshopathic killer but when you get down to the nitty gritty (his motivation) you start to wonder what would you do to stay alive one more day, one more year?

And though he was a villain, I cried when he died.

Cassandra Kane said...

Lynda, Blade Runner was great, and I totally fell in love with Rutger Hauer. What a bod! *g* IMO it's one of the best clone stories because the plot was pretty original, and the expiry-date on angle added extra pathos.

Actually, I think I'm beginning to see a trend in my posts - originality vs cliches! Either I'm getting jaded or there just aren't any good ideas that are grabbing my attention. I think I'm just jaded, though. Though I shouldn't have expected originality from Hollywood, eh?

Lynda K. Scott said...

Cassandra,

Hollywood and, yes, even publishing seems hellbent to capitalize on whatever the latest 'gimmick' (ie plot) might be. It isn't really surprising when we see a bunch of movies, or books, that could aptly be described as 'the same as BIGNAME movie (book) and only the names have been changed.'

Money will always win over originality. Sigh.

Cassandra Kane said...

Then someone comes up with something original and gets launched into bestsellerdom! Maybe we're about due for the next big thing *g*