Monday, August 23, 2010

Guest - Paty Jager

Good morning everyone! Today's guest is a wife, mother, grandmother; and award winning author. Paty Jager and her husband farm 350 acres. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it. Paty has been a member of RWA for twelve years belonging to several online chapters as well as EPIC, Women Writing the West, and Central Oregon Writers Guild. She has five historical western romance novels, one historical paranormal, and one contemporary western published. Her second contemporary western will be published in Jan. 2011. Her first contemporary western, won the 2008 Best Contemporary Romance EPPIE.

Make sure you read all the way down to the Lynda Again section to see details for Paty's offer of a pdf copy of her novel Spirit of the Mountain.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Shapeshifting

If someone had told me I'd write a paranormal book I would have laughed in their faces. As a child the abominable snowman on Rudolph scared me. I've never liked things that go bump in the night. But I enjoy reading books about witches, ghosts, and spirits. Not creepy stories but ones that have these netherworld entities helping. Doing good things. The use of herbs and nature by witches and medicine men has always intrigued me.

When I wrapped my mind around the crazy idea of writing a paranormal historical the first thing that came to my mind is the Native American culture and their myths and legends. Their spirits, medicine men, and the Creator.

I knew the tribe I wanted to write about and I found books filled with their myths and legends.

The Nez Perce have shapeshifters in their stories. The most notable was coyote. He usually played tricks or wreaked havoc. Slowly the idea to have shapeshifting spirits in the story formed and I started researching shapeshifters. This is the info I came up with.

Shapeshifting- When a being has the ability to alter its physical appearance.

This transformation may be purposeful or not, depending on if they changed due to a curse or a spell. Usually if they are changed buy a curse they are bound to the form.

The shifted forms powers can differ depending on the curse or spell. Some turn into a brave or strong animal to fight better and others change to deceive.

Some use shapeshifting to manipulate other beings. While others need specific items to change shapes.

Popular shapes are werewolves, vampires, gods, goddesses, demons, Fairies, witches, wizards, and human to any animal.

I used all the information I found and came up with siblings who were made spirits(shapeshifters) by the Creator for the good of the Nimiipuu or Nez Perce of the Wallowa Lake. He gave them each a specific form for roaming the territory they watched over. A wolf, an elk, and a bald eagle. But they could also shift into other animals and humans to help heal or manipulate a situation. They could also shift into their original man forms if a necessity. But they were not to reveal they were spirits. I didn't give them an item to use to shift. They merely had to think smoke and they become and shape or shift into one nearby. But they have to be in the animal form some every day. And Himiin the hero in Spirit of the Mountain was not allowed to leave the mountain or he would become smoke and never shift again. You'll have to read the book to find out why.


Blurb for Spirit of the Mountain

Wren, the daughter of a Nimiipuu chief, has been fated to save her people ever since her vision quest. When a warrior from the enemy Blackleg tribe asks for her hand in marriage to bring peace between the tribes, her world is torn apart.

Himiin is the spirit of the mountain, custodian to all creatures including the Nimiipuu. As a white wolf he listens to Wren’s secret fears and loses his heart to the mortal maiden. Respecting her people’s beliefs, he cannot prevent her leaving the mountain with the Blackleg warrior.

When an evil spirit threatens Wren’s life, Himiin must leave the mountain to save her. But to leave the mountain means he’ll turn to smoke...

Excerpt

Wren’s eyes glistened with unshed tears. “My gift is to save The People. The weyekin who came to me in my vision quest said this.” She wrapped her arms around herself as if staving off a cold breeze.

Himiin hated that they argued when they should relish their time together. He moved to her, drawing her against his chest, embracing her. The shape of her body molded to his. Her curves pressed against him. Holding her this way flamed the need he’d tried to suppress.

He placed a hand under her chin, raising her face to his. The sorrow in her eyes tugged at his conscience. To make her leaving any harder was wrong. But having experienced her in his arms, he was grieved to let her go. Even for the sake of their people.

Her eyelids fluttered closed. Her pulse quickened under his fingers. Shrugging off the consequences, he lowered his lips to hers. They were softer than he imagined. Her breath hitched as he touched her intimately. Parting his lips, he touched her with his tongue, wanting to see if she tasted as sweet as she smelled.

She tasted of sweet honey straight from the bosom of a bee tree.

One taste was not enough. He pulled her closer, moving his lips across hers, tasting and savoring the feel of them.

His body came to life. The sensations transcended anything he’d experienced before. How could one woman make him feel powerful and vulnerable at the same time? Why did he wish to crush her to him and never let go and yet feel compelled to treat her with the tenderness one would give the tiniest of creatures? He couldn’t continue this way.

To hold her, to touch her soft skin. He would never be able to let her go.


What's coming?

My editor has the second book of this trilogy, Spirit of the Lake. Wewukiye, the elk spirit, and brother to Himiin, rescues a maiden from the lake and joins forces with her to prove the White man her people believe to be a friend is out to destroy them.

I also have a contemporary western, Bridled Heart, releasing January 2011.

To learn more about Paty drop by her website: http://www.patyjager.net
Her blog: http://www.patyjager.blogspot.com
Or purchase her books at the Wild Rose Press: http://www.thewildrosepress.com/paty-jager-m-19.html?zenid=405d2339917fc939065d912a527a8e08

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-- Lynda Again

Paty has offered a pdf copy of Spirit of the Mountain to one lucky Star-Crossed Romance reader who leaves a comment AND emails Paty at patyjag@gmail.com with STAR-CROSSED ROMANCE in the subject line by noon Friday Aug 27

13 comments:

Pauline B Jones said...

What a fascinating look at shifting!I'm impressed with the research. Another fun interview!

Kathy Otten said...

I'm always amazed by how many books you are able to write with your busy life. I normally wouldn't think fantasy had so much research involved in order to make it believable, but it looks like you've done a lot. Good luck with your sales. You have a beautiful cover.

Paty Jager said...

Pauline, Besides the historical research I had to do the shapeshifting research. But it was all so interesting I didn't find it a hard task. Thank you for commenting.

Paty Jager said...

Hi Kathy!

Thank you for stopping in! this book was written almost five years ago. It just took this long to find it a home. I love the cover, too!

Hales said...

Hey Paty,
What a great blog post. I love shapeshifting and the various ways it's brought to life.You're cover is breathtaking.

Paty Jager said...

Hi Hales! Thanks! Shapeshifting is interesting.

Linda Sandifer said...

It sounds like a great read, Paty. I've always been interested in the paranormal and have written a few of them myself. Good luck with it!

Paty Jager said...

Thanks Linda. This is my first try and I'm excited to see how people respond.

Cherie J said...

I love it when an author does extensive research for their books. One of the questions I like to ask authors is what kind of research they did for their book so I was thrilled to read your answer. Sounds like you enjoyed the research process as well as the writing process. Love the unique storyline. What a terrific idea to combine two genres. Love the cover as well. Sounds like my kind of read.

Elise Dee Beraru said...

I am fascinated by your use of Nez Perce shapeshifting mythology for your story instead of the traditional European take in most stories. The short story I just sold to L&L Dreamspell alludes to a Native American curse turning the hero into a shapeshifter, but my story is totally my imagination, not related to any specific mythology.

Tanya Hanson said...

Hi Paty, thanks for the information but more for the blurb and excerpt. I totally love and admire the Nez Perce. The shape-shifting insight was terrific. Best of luck!

Sarah Raplee said...

Paty, One of the things I admire about your writing is your dedication to research. What a shame it took so long for this book to find a home! It sounds woonderful!

Paty Jager said...

Thanks Cherie, I always do twice as much research as I need, but it helps me in the long run, I think.

Elise, Your story sounds interesting.

Thanks Tanya!

Hi Sarah. Yeah, I had an agent you loved it but said she couldn't sell it to a publisher because no one wants NA stories.