Monday, May 24, 2010

Guest - Don Luis de la Cosa

Good morning everyone! Today's guest is author Don Luis de la Cosa, who has given us a very interesting take on writing science fiction. Plus he's given us lots of links to further answer any questions we may have. Enjoy!

Oh, and if you leave a comment PLUS if you either join my newsgroup or are already a member, I'll enter your name in a drawing to take place when Heartstone becomes available. Read the -- Lynda Again section to see what the prizes will be.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

World building in science fiction is exceedingly crucial to the development of a good story. But, world building is something of an amorphous concept if the task itself is not properly contextualized. Primary among concerns when writing deliciously effective science fiction pieces is to ensure that the science element is sound, a topic for which I have written an entirely different post.

However, all things being equal, in terms of building a world, think – and think often – of our own diminutive blue sphere. Ours is a planet replete with tropicalities, aridities, glacialities, rushing water, heart stopping heights, and that’s just on the surface. Beneath ground, Gollum- like creatures mix in an infinite variety of environments, and in the deep oceans, beasts with names such as the Vampyroteuthis Infernalis exist, though they receive conspicuously little publicity. A few years ago, the BBC completed a documentary entitled “Planet Earth”, which I highly recommend if only so that you can foment a base for what sort of evolutionary concepts are available. You will notice that I use a great deal of visuals – movies and related accoutrement, - to explain literary concepts, but I feel that the message is essentially the same.

Nextly, science-fiction, much like is frequently the case in zombie films, have something of a political bent. The 1980’s film classic Robocop, aside from all the what was for then incredibly fast-paced, high-octane action sequences, warns explicitly of the dangers in allowing an authoritarian military/police establishment too much latitude and the ability to control too much.

Waterwold explores another extreme, where the whole of our planet is now inundated, supposedly as a result of the polar ice caps melting due to global warming. Seen correctly, and with the proper guidance, the 90’s era Wachowski brothers opus The Matrix comprises the entire Buddhist life cycle, but from the perspective of a world overtaken entirely by machines. The Harrison Ford lead Blade Runner posits the polemic of what if artificially intelligent androids designed to be “more human than human” (a reality not so far off in the future any longer) actually succeed in their mission.

Enemy Mine is the Louis Gosset Jr. and Dennis Quaid captained space odyssey of two interstellar fighter pilots whose heated dogfight crash-lands them on an entirely undeveloped, little-known planet on the edges of the area over which their planet’s race and ours are warring. During the course of the film, they each learn each other’s language, and the fact that their respective religions even have parallel philosophies. “Truth is truth” is the poignant line from the film.

In the end, and the long –winded point here is, each of these stories brings with it the film maker’s own brand of parameters; just like any board game, field game, or video game, there are rules to how each planet operates, and how its inhabitants must operate within it. Some of the most pervasive social problems that are frequently set against the backdrop of science-fiction resolutions are, for example: border conflicts, xenophobia, weapons technology, species (especially homo sapiens sapiens) evolution, terra- forming, multi-national companies doing nefarious deeds, and ‘religion’ in a variety of forms.

We, for example, have one sun, and one moon, with religions based on each. Imagine coming from a planet circling a binary star system, or having 4, 5, or 6 moons. How big would the planet have to be to have enough specific gravity to hold onto 4 (or more) moons? How long would one of their days be? What would their plants, or people, or animals look like? What if the main ingredient in their air was chlorine instead of nitrogen and oxygen? How would you solve the problem of humans on an exploratory or diplomatic mission breathing there without having to constantly rely on oxygen tanks all the time?

To solve these problems myself, I always start with reading classics – Frank Herbert’s Dune series, Phillip K Dick, William Gibson, Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Piers Anthony, etc. However, I happen to like my own examples, all very adult fiction oriented, which you can find on my Amazon Author’s page, or by clicking the links below.

As always, go out and experience the world. The very best authors have a wealth of interesting life stories to weave into their fiction, they don’t just copy styles. So, challenge yourself, put down the iPad, PDA, TV remote, XBOX controller, or what have you, and get out of the house. Go climb a tree and read a book, or take a rafting trip and journal the entire time, travel somewhere really far from home, and learn a new language, and do it often. I can’t emphasize enough the absolute necessity of having something interesting to talk about when you write. Once you have that, you can take your pen anywhere, and have it make sense. Thanks for reading!

Join My Facebook Fan page!

See my Amazon Author’s page!

Or follow me on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/donluisdelacosa

Mythos follows daring adventurers through rough seas tantalized by the Kraken's appropriately adapted appendages, a wondrous land through which Alice might never have survived, a knight in shining armor that saves his paramour from a life of servitude, and urban fiction that reminds us the city can be as much about magical realism, as any other fantasy locale.




In Battery Drain, Alex's life is pretty simple: hack through the back doors of a few multinational companies' accounting sections, grab a million here, a million there, and feed his addictions. But a recent run in with a virtual security system forced him to reexamine his priorities. That's when Morgan reappeared in his life. Morgan - seductive, deadly, beautiful raven haired assassin that haunts men's dreams, walks out of a crowd and hands him the opportunity for a new kind of mission, one that includes her as a bonus prize. In return, Alex must become a cybernetically enhanced superwarrior, question his own humanity, and all along, Morgan fades in and out of his dreams, his personal experience, and continues to offer her influence and her sexual favors, in his life.



With These Eyes I Do Not Truly See is a snapshot in the life of one unsuspecting, successful, urban professional woman whose life seems meticulously planned from her current stage through retirement. Planned, that is, until she decides on a whim to join some colleagues from her graduate class at a bar in Manhattan's Lower East Side, only to find out that she's the object of a particular vampire's bloodlust, and passion!...




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-- Lynda Again
In addition to a free e-copy of Heartstone,




the winner will receive a LED Ear Light














and a 6-in-1 Mini Desk Tool.






You'll also receive your very own Heartstone necklace!








Wookie loves lots of names to pick from and you can increase your odds of winning by entering every week until Heartstone is released. So don't delay, join my newsgroup, leave a comment for this blog and email me with the words Heartstone Grand Prize in the subject line. Wookie loves lots of names to pick from.


Become a member of my newsgroup, enter the contest and perhaps you'll win! You'll love the prizes, trust me :-) (Note: Prizes may not appear exactly as they are shown)

Directions on how to join the newsgroup are below. Hope to see you there!

To join my newsletter, send a blank email to:
LyndaKScott-Newsgroup-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Be My Friend http://www.myspace.com/lyndakscott
My Website: http://www.lyndakscott.com
My Blog: http://www.lyndakscott.blogspot.com
Tweet me: http://www.twitter.com/lyndakscott
Be My Friend on:
Bebo: http://www.bebo.com/lyndakscott
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lyndakscott

Technorati Tags:
, , ,

Flickr Tags:
, , ,

Del.icio.us Tags:
, , ,

Furl Tags:
, , ,

7 comments:

Linda Andrews said...

Very interesting blog. I like your suggestion to go out and experience our world and I loved Planet Earth. For exotic and hostile environments, we don't have to look farther than our beloved planet.

Pauline B Jones said...

good suggestions! an author i think does an excellent job of integrating world building into the story is Jasper Fforde.

Lorrie said...

I have read every novel you mentioned. All classics as far as I am concerned. Great post and all your stories look promising. Here I go again, adding to my TBR pile.

SiNn said...

I loveee your blog and ur work and the fact that im a member is awesome whata cool contest

Lynda K. Scott said...

Hi y'all! If you want to enter the contest, first - make sure you're a member of my newsgroup, then send me an email with Heartstone Grand Prize on the subject line. Wookie will be thrilled to have a lot of entries to pick from :-)

Pamk said...

great interview and I am already a member of your newsletter group and i'll definitely send you an email.

Don Luis de la Cosa said...

Thanks everyone for the comments! I'm unfortunately living without a laptop at the moment, and just now saw them all via my Blackberry. Looking forward to doing this again in the future!

D/L/