Monday, December 10, 2012

Vampire Trivia

We had a bit of a scheduling problem so I don't have a guest today BUT I have some interesting Vampire trivia if you're interested.

Ready?

Many scholars argue the word "vampire" is either from the Hungarian vampir or from the Turkish upior, upper, upyr meaning "witch." Other scholars argue the term derived from the Greek word "to drink" or from the Greek nosophoros meaning "plague carrier." It may also derive from the Serbian Bamiiup or the Serbo-Crotian pirati. 




The Muppet vampire, Count von Count from Sesame Street, is based on actual vampire myth. One way to supposedly deter a vampire is to throw seeds (usually mustard) outside a door or place fishing net outside a window. Vampires are compelled to count the seeds or the holes in the net, delaying them until the sun comes up.







One of the most famous "true vampires" was Countess Elizabeth Bathory (1560-1614) who was accused of biting the flesh of girls while torturing them and bathing in their blood to retain her youthful beauty.






Vampire hysteria and corpse mutilations to "kill" suspected vampires were so pervasive in Europe during the mid-eighteenth century that some rulers created laws to prevent the unearthing of bodies. In some areas, mass hysteria led to public executions of people believed to be vampires.

Thresholds have historically held significant symbolic value, and a vampire cannot cross a threshold unless invited. The connection between threshold and vampires seems to be a concept of complicity or allowance. Once a commitment is made to allow evil, evil can re-enter at any time.




Prehistoric stone monuments called “dolmens” have been found over the graves of the dead in northwest Europe. Anthropologists speculate they have been placed over graves to keep vampires from rising.





The legend that vampires must sleep in coffins probably arose from reports of gravediggers and morticians who described corpses suddenly sitting up in their graves or coffins. This eerie phenomenon could be caused by the decomposing process.


I'd heard of a lot of this but hadn't heard the bit about dolmen before. Kind of interesting, huh?

Have a Blessed Day!

8 comments:

Angelyn said...

Loved Frank Langella in that role.

Lynda K. Scott said...

Me too! He was the first, IIRC, to be a romantic Dracula instead of just a scary one.

Paisley Kirkpatrick said...

Very interesting information. I've just recently started reading books with vampires. My new CP writes them and I am enjoying getting into the lore.

Linda Andrews said...

I didn't relate the Count to vampire mythology. Very cool

Ally Broadfield said...

Interesting post. I don't read a lot of vampire stories, but I definitely prefer those that try to follow the historical lore surrounding them.

Mary Frances Roya said...

I had heard of the obession of a vampire to count seeds. Too funny. Enjoy your blog. I read about vampires all the time. But I drew the line with the ones that sprakle. Tee hee! I sure hope the books were better than the movies.

Lynda K. Scott said...

I still don't get the 'sparkle' vampire thing...isn't that noticeable? How do they explain it? LOL I always wonder at weird things. Hubby hates to watch movies with me, lol

Lisa Kessler said...

Fun trivia Lynda!!! :)

Thanks for putting that together...

Lisa :)